Prevention and Management of Non-Communicable Disease in low-income community

Non-Communicable Diseases (NCD) are leading cause of premature mortality. According to Indian State-Level Disease Burden Initiative report, disease burden of India has shifted from Communicable, maternal, neonatal, and nutritional diseases (CMNNDS) to non- communicable diseases over the period of 1990 to 2016 from 37.9% to 61.8%.

 

Risk segment and socio-economic impact of NCD

Though major NCD diseases are associated with old age people approximately 42% of all NCD deaths globally occurred before the age of 70 years. Children, adults and the elderly are all vulnerable to the risk factors contributing to NCDs. Poverty is another factor closely linked with NCDs. In resource constraint setting of healthcare, NCDs increases out of pocket expenditure of an individual or sometimes loss of breadwinner of the family forcing many families below the poverty line. Vulnerable and socially disadvantaged people get sicker and die sooner than people of higher social positions, especially because they are at greater risk of being exposed to harmful products, such as tobacco, or unhealthy dietary practices, and have limited access to health services.

 

Chronic Disease Prevention Programme, an initiative towards NCD management:


iKure together with MIT Sloan School of Management in the District of Paschim Medinipur, iKure initiated a study on NCD with randomly selected 500 people in test group. The initiative is measured following parameters to get greater insight on the contributing factors towards cause of NCD. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), Hb1AC, Systolic Blood Pressure, and BMI are collected to derive the analytics. Using power BI tool following trend has been identified where 25% of all respondents suffered from type1 diabetes, 43% type2 diabetes, 11.8% with high cholesterol, 65.6% hypertensive and 5% obese. Though it is surprising to know such trends were known to affect the elite group, but our findings shows the emergence of NCD trends even in low-income community group.

Moreover, the High-cholesterol, High Blood pressure and High pulse rate was a common trend among identified high risk CVD patient found in 8.4% of the population.

Further, we found high risk CVD zone affected mostly within 56-80 years of age group.
Case of Diabetes was found between 41-56 years age group and females are marginally more prone to diabetic in the catchment areas.

The clinical observation was recorded during door-step screening, monitoring, and doctor’s consultations. The high-risk patients were provided tertiary care through telemedicine platform and appropriate medication. Awareness was created by the CHWs on self-management, prevention and control on NCDs.
 

Conclusion:

In the heterogeneous country like India, iKure is putting the right step forward to achieve WHO’s global targets for prevention and control of non-communicable disease by 2013-2020.